Monday, 2 October 2006

Richard Wilson | BBC Collective

For the second Curve art commission, Richard Wilson, the prominent British sculptor known for his ephemeral projects of spatial interventions, has successfully conquered the problematic Curve gallery with a three-part installation. 

Wilson greets the viewer at both gallery entrances with two large video projections. The films document an event; a claustrophobic groaning Wilson savagely dismantling the inside of a Black Cab in Meter’s Running and an oddly motionless caravan interior of cupboards flying open and curtains flapping in Trailer Trash. However, these films contradict the actual objects that are hidden behind the projection screens and challenge your experience of them. 

Unaccompanied by a video, Hot Dog Roll sits awkwardly like outer space debris at the central curvature of the gallery. With its jutting constructivist angels, it’s a mangled impression of a hot dog stand. Utilising the visually obstructive gallery, Wilson has reversed the use of space and form by presenting “outside objects” inside, then depicting them inside out through film. 

THE REVIEW WAS PUBLISHED ON BBC COLLECTIVE 28 SEPTEMBER 2006